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Building the Conscience of Humankind: An Analysis of the Use of Selective Imagery on the 75th Anniversary of International Criminal Justice

Author:

Kevin Gerenni

LLM (London School of Economics and Political Science) '21, GB
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Abstract

Last November marked the 75th anniversary of the start of the Nuremberg Trials, a milestone that the Tokyo Trial will in turn reach next May. These two proceedings instituted the long-awaited birth of international criminal justice, after the frustrated trial of Kaiser Wilhelm II following the Great War and the Treaty of Versailles. From the very outset, images played a fundamental role in shaping international criminal justice before its audience. This article analyses how the use of visual elements (i.e., the depiction of victim suffering) has been instrumental in driving international criminal justice–and, therefore, law–in certain directions, whereas censorship (i.e., the depiction of victimlessness) has contributed to the avoidance of undesired paths. I argue that this manipulation through image has been utilised to build a conscience of humankind and thus achieve greater legitimacy of international criminal law in its inaugural trials, while attempting to conceal one of the greatest pitfalls of the field: selectivity.
How to Cite: Gerenni, K., 2021. Building the Conscience of Humankind: An Analysis of the Use of Selective Imagery on the 75th Anniversary of International Criminal Justice. LSE Law Review, 6(3), pp.209–222.
Published on 15 Mar 2021.
Peer Reviewed

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